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The Mother of Reinvention

Lately I’ve been doing a fair amount of speaking at industry events across the country on a range of topics, everything from cider to managing SKU proliferation in the warehouse. Each presentation has had its own unique challenges, but I have to admit, none have been more challenging that the one for the panel I moderated last month at The Beverage Forum. And the reason for that is the disparate nature of the four speakers (other than me) on the panel: Becky McAninch of Kraft, speaking specifically about the company’s MiO water enhancers; Paddy Spence, CEO of Zevia zero-calorie CSDs; Andy Thomas, CEO of Craft Brew Alliance (CBA) and Charles van Es of Heineken USA (who graced our April cover), addressing the company’s Strongbow brand.

So what was it exactly that binds this diverse lot together? That was my conundrum. And then it hit me in the form of one word: reinvention. It’s a concept that has driven some facet of each of the brands that will be showcased on the main Forum stage.

When Kraft launched MiO it was essentially reinventing the way consumers drink water. More specifically how they enhance their water. Value-added water has been on a bit of a downward trajectory over the past couple of years, according to Beverage Marketing Corporation (BMC, our partner on The Beverage Forum). Last year, BMC reports, value-added water dipped nearly 7 percent. The emergence of flavor drops, such as MiO was really rooted in the overarching customization trend. In this age of social media, Spotify and Pandora, consumers, especially the mammoth millennial demographic, are looking to have everything their way. And with products like MiO, they can determine just how much flavor and functionality their water has.

Zevia seized on a similar downward market trend—albeit one on a much grander scale than functional water. The CSD market has been declining for most of the past decade, as consumers are looking beyond just simple refreshment in their liquid refreshment products. Two terms that keep popping up are “natural” and “healthy” and those are words that often are associated with Zevia’s signature ingredient, stevia. Zevia, in essence, is a reinvention of the struggling soda category.

The whole craft beer phenomenon, one could argue, is a reinvention of the overall beer category and some of the core brands in the CBA portfolio, Widmer and Red Hook in particular, were among the pioneering players in the segment involved in that reinvention. However, companies like CBA are reinventing the specialty segment even further through their marketing strategy. They’re recognizing that there’s not really such thing as a “craft drinker” but sub-segments within the craft universe that need to be targeted with the utmost precision.

And a similar scenario is playing out in the surging cider market. As the category enjoys its current explosion, brand owners are realizing that there really isn’t a “cider drinker” per se.  It’s segmenting much like the overall beer market has: There are the premium domestics (think A-B’s new launch Johnny Appleseed and MillerCoors’ Smith & Forge), the crafts (such as this month’s Breakout Brand Virtue) and then the imports (Stella Artois Cidre, for instance). But Heineken USA has recognized that there’s segmentation even beyond imports into the upscale, lifestyle, “badge brand” space—a space that it hopes to define by the reinvention of its venerable, classic Strongbow trademark.

The general rule in today’s beverage market is that there are no rules. Those who try to adhere to “the way things have always been done” will be mere spectators as the world is reinvented around them.

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