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Don't Let Quality Be Blinded By Quantity

If there’s one theme that sticks in my head from last month’s Craft Brewers Conference (CBC) & BrewExpo America in Denver, it’s quality versus quantity. Or, more specifically, how much does the latter help or hurt the former?
 
The quality issue has been a running theme at the past handful of CBCs and has been a core talking point in Brewers Association director Paul Gatza’s annual State of the Craft Brewing Industry address. And it kind of has to be, especially when you’re bringing quantity into the equation. By quantity, I mean, of course, the exploding number of new breweries getting into the craft business year after year. Just last year the number of new craft operations surged by about 15 percent to 2,768 at the end of 2013.  

It’s exciting but it’s also somewhat frightening and that sentiment’s certainly not lost on the folks at the Brewers Association. It’s a segment whose key players have survived and thrived largely because of an uncompromising commitment to quality. The pioneers got in the business when there was no bandwagon on which to jump or wave to ride.

But now, as everyone from financial community to amateur brewing hobbyists are hip to the accelerating growth of craft, there could be many getting into the business without getting their heads around what’s truly involved. I’ve spoken to more than a few people who’s said, “I’m a pretty good home brewer and my friends said I should start a brewery. So I did.” And more than a few others among the moneyed classes who’ve said, “I hear craft brewing’s hot, so I’m going to invest in it even though I don’t know much about it or really care all that much about beer.”

I can somewhat relate with the first group. It wouldn’t be immodest of me to say that the dozen years I’ve been writing about beer (not to mention every other beverage) that I know slightly more than the average consumer about it.

But I could never claim to know as much or more about beer than actual brewers or authors who’ve had several books published on the topic—many of whom I count among my friends. The friends not involved in beer in anyway, however, think I know “everything” about the beverage because I know a few more things about it than they do. So I’ve had them tell me on more than one occasion, “Hey, you should start a brewery.” Umm, no. There are two types of insight my experience has afforded me. No. 1: Running a brewery is hard work.  No. 2: The more I learn about brewing the more I learn how little I know about brewing.

So it scares me when folks say they’d committed their every penny to a business based on nothing more than the urgings of less-knowledgeable friends.
   
Don’t get me wrong, I’m thrilled that there’s so much interest in craft beer and so many new players. I fell in love with craft beer my first year at Beverage World and the rise of the segment over the past decade-plus has paralleled my own personal beer geek adventure.

This is personal for me. I don’t want this surge in quantity to be at the expense of quality. Because it’s quality that really makes craft...well, craft.

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